What will your story be?

What you do on campus and how you get involved in our communities is entirely up to you. Every year begins with the networking event Weaving New Beginnings, where you can find opportunities and a community to support you. Do you want to focus on building strong relationships through a program focused on succeeding at the UO? Or maybe you want to be involved in celebrating legacy and cultural heritage through major events on campus. Whatever your interests are, there are opportunities and a community for you. You get to choose how your successful college experience is defined. The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success staff is here to help you get there.


Multicultural Events and Programs

Throughout the year there are a variety of events and programs hosted by students and community members focused on sharing experiences and discussions around culture and heritage with the campus community.

IMPACT

IMPACT is a peer-to-peer mentoring program for students of color and first-generation college students. Students can participate as either a new student or as an IMPACT coordinator.

Weaving New Beginnings

A networking reception to welcome new students, faculty, and staff of color. This event has kicked off our fall term for more than 20 years and has become an exciting campus tradition. All are welcome. 

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

Every year the campus comes together to celebrate the lasting legacy of Dr. King's work. With award celebrations, a community march, service project, and a keynote speaker this celebration brings our community together to honor our shared vision to continue moving forward and pays tribute to the individuals who have bravely stood for justice and peace.

Raices Unida Youth Conference

Latinx high schoolers from around the state of Oregon gather at the UO for a full-day conference to connect with each other and learn about access to higher education.

Heritage and History Events

During Heritage and History Months, students, faculty, and staff come together to celebrate the stories, cultures, traditions, and experiences of various cultures.


Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success Hours

Monday–Friday: 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Creating a common dialogue

The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success program is a place where all students are welcome to meet, plan, and help create a stronger community. It is a place that helps you connect with students of all races and backgrounds to collaborate around cultural programming and education. Our office leads IMPACT and collaborates on a number of events and celebrations throughout the year.


Resources

The Division of Student Life—as well as many offices and programs in the Division of Equity and Inclusion—work closely with a number of campus services to connect you with resources, services, and community. Below are a number of resources you might find helpful.


Events

Sep 23
Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years—The Eugene Story11:00 a.m.

  Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and...
October 12 2019–December 31 2020
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

 

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration as new voices clashed with traditional organizations of power. Co-developed by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon Black Pioneers, the exhibit illuminates legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of Oregon's Black communities to bring about change. 

Through photographs, recorded interviews, and historical archives, Racing to Change explores how racist policies and attitudes created a pressing need for bold civil rights activism in Eugene. Firsthand accounts from movement organizers, former UO students, elected officials, and other members of Oregon's black communities paint a vivid picture of the area's past, and urge us to take part in building a more just future. 

The museum is open Wednesdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  In accordance with university and state public health mandates, we will require everyone onsite to wear masks or other face coverings and maintain a distance of six feet from anyone outside their households. 

Public hours and safety protocols are subject to change based on guidance from the University of Oregon and the Oregon Health Authority. Please stay tuned to our COVID-19 Updates page for developing information.

Sep 28
Exhibit: Timber Culture7:00 a.m.

The Timber Culture exhibit, curated by Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, offers unique views into the histories of logging, migration, and both...
September 28–November 6
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Aperture Gallery

The Timber Culture exhibit, curated by Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, offers unique views into the histories of logging, migration, and both segregation and integration in Oregon history. Through portraits that range from intimate to formal, the images of people demonstrate that this history was lived by individual people who came together to build relationships and community together. Images of buildings and work equipment ground viewers in time and place, and the captions both provide context and add information about people and places not in the pictures. The exhibit is effective for both fostering quiet contemplation and generating conversation, making it a great fit for all public places."

Sep 30
LERC Fall Webinar Series 5:00 p.m.

September 30, 5–6:15pm Interrupting Systems of Oppression in our Unions Sandra Lane and Paris Walker, AFSCME This training will explore how institutional racism shows up...
September 30–October 21

September 30, 5–6:15pm
Interrupting Systems of Oppression in our Unions
Sandra Lane and Paris Walker, AFSCME
This training will explore how institutional racism shows up in our society and the labor movement. Participants will identify historical and institutional barriers in our unions to building stronger, inclusive unions that fight for all workers.
REGISTER NOW!

October 7, 5–6:15pm
Understanding organized anti-union campaigns and sentiments by examining unionization in the 21 century.
Daniel Ho-Sang, Yale University, and Sherman Henry, LERC
How might a new vision for a Public Reconstruction in the wake of the pandemic help to shore up support for unions and build new commitments for an expansion of public and private sector interest that protects the well-being of all workers?

October 14, 5–6:15pm
Exploring Systemic Racism in Arbitration
Barbara Diamond, Diamond Law
Unions rely heavily on arbitration to resolve contract disputes. Arbitration is not immune from the impact of institutionalized racism. How does racial and gender bias show up in the arbitration process and what can unions do to combat it? 

October 21, 5–6:15pm
Toolbox Essentials for Creating Racial Justice
Donna Hammond, IBEW 48
Allies for racial justice in the trades has three domains; (1) Apprentice, (2) Union membership, and (3) Leadership. These domains will help unionists explore the complexities of creating an inclusive culture. We will discuss the internal process of NECA and IBEW Local 48 as an auto ethnography of Donna Hammond’s reflective experience as a Business Representative. 

All talks are free and open to all.  Questions? Contact the University of Oregon Labor Education and Research Center

Contact Us

 
DJ Kelly-Quattrocchi
Coordinator, Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success