Donate: Advancing the Mission of the Black Cultural Center

2021 Black Grad Ceremony

Congratulations to the Class of 2021 Black Grads!

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, the Black Student Union, and the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence celebrate and recognize our Black graduates in a virtual ceremony.

Announcing the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center Scholarships

Individual awards will range between $750–$5,000. Apply now through May 14, 2021.

Virtual Engagement

We are committed to maintaining high levels of support and resources for our students. During this time, the BCC and Dean of Students staff will continue to check and respond to voicemails and emails. In addition, the BCC will continue to offer resource navigation and support remotely, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. To reach the coordinator of the BCC, call 541-346-6321 or email arish@uoregon.edu if you need assistance. To reach the Dean of Students crisis team, call 541-346-3216.

Refer to the site below for official updates regarding the University of Oregon’s response to COVID-19, including frequently asked questions.

During the 2020–21 academic year, the university will be offering learning primarily online and remotely. While we may not be able to engage with one another within the BCC, we do welcome students to connect with the Black Cultural Center staff virtually. Please join us on social media and Zoom for events such as Virtual Super Soul Tuesdays and other virtual interactions and programming.

Umoja Black Scholars Academic Residential Community

Umoja Black Scholars image

The Umoja Black Scholars ARC is a space in the residence halls where Black students can come together, grow in their own identities, engage with peer mentors, and connect with academic advising and resources.

Applications for the 2021–22 Umoja Black Scholars cohort are open now through May 31, 2021.

Learn About Umoja Black Scholars

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Black Cultural Center

While the LRP Black Cultural Center is currently closed due to state and university guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still supporting students in person and remotely.

The outside porch of the BCC will be available to a limited number of students during Dr. Aris Hall's office hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1:00–4:00 p.m.; and Thursdays, 9:00 a.m.–noon.

1870 East 15th Avenue
Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. (offering services remotely)

BCC entry

Get Connected

If you are interested in staying up to date about what’s going on with the BCC, please provide your name and email using our online form to be added to our mailing list.


Our Mission

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is the engine for Black students’ academic success at the University of Oregon. The BCC is a welcoming and supportive space that helps Black students harness the resources necessary to navigate their social, cultural, and academic experience. By investing in the success of Black students, the BCC enhances the cultural and social development of the entire University of Oregon community.


Black Cultural Center Opening from University of Oregon on Vimeo.

UO Black Lives Matter


About Lyllye Reynolds-Parker

Lyllye Reynolds-ParkerLyllye Reynolds-Parker was born in Eugene in 1946 and was a member of the first graduating class of Henry D. Sheldon High School. Ms. Parker started her social justice work while in high school, being actively involved with the civil rights movement here. She was vice president of the local Student Non-violence Committee, an organization founded by Stokely Carmichael, an internationally known civil rights advocate.

Ms. Parker earned her BA in sociology from the UO in 1991. She worked at the UO as an academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success for 17 years, until she retired.

Ms. Parker has served on multiple advisory committees. She also serves on the board of a local nonprofit, the League of United Latin American Citizens, where she is the honorary chair of their Anti-Racial Profiling Committee.

The UO’s Women’s Center hosts an annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of Color Speaker Series to bring female speakers of color to campus.

Contact Us

 
Aris Hall, PhD
Coordinator, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center


Events

Jan 19
Let's Talk: Black Student Support2:00 p.m.

Talk with a Black/African American Specialist and Psychologist Dr. Cecile Gadson will be available on Wednesdays from 2-4 p.m. She is a psychologist who focuses on...
January 5–March 9
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Talk with a Black/African American Specialist and Psychologist

Dr. Cecile Gadson will be available on Wednesdays from 2-4 p.m. She is a psychologist who focuses on the needs of Black/African American students.
 
What is Let’s Talk?

Let’s Talk is a drop-in service that provides easy access to a free, informal confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services counselor.
 
What makes Let’s Talk different from counseling services at UCS?


No appointment necessary (first-come, first-served)
No paperwork to be completed
Easy access support and consultation


 
Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:


Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it
Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling
Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like
Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists
Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do


 
How does Let’s Talk work?

In Winter 2022, this Let's Talk session will be offered in person again at the LRP Black Cultural Center. Dr. Gadson will be available to meet with students once they check in using the QR code you'll get to speak with Dr. Gadson as soon as she's available. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis.

Jan 25
Non-Eurocentric Approaches to Self-Love - Discussion Series4:00 p.m.

Join our discussion series for students interested in sharing or learning about what self-care looks like in various non-Western cultures. Specifically, we will talk about the...
January 25–February 8
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Mills International Center, Erb Memorial Union Mezzanine 102

Join our discussion series for students interested in sharing or learning about what self-care looks like in various non-Western cultures. Specifically, we will talk about the non-Eurocentric views of well-being, the body, food, social connections, and support seeking. Through the discussions, we hope to facilitate holistic self-care and healing, raise critical consciousness of the impact of Eurocentric values/worldview on our health, and empower individuals with a non-Eurocentric culture of origin by helping them reconnect to their cultural roots.

Topics by date:

Tuesday, January 25 - Holistic Well-being
Tuesday, February 1 - Nurturing Relationship with Body and Food
Tuesday, February 8 - Social Support and Help-Seeking in Holistic Cultures

Jan 25
MLK 2022 Keynote Speaker Payton Head5:30 p.m.

UO's 2022 Martin Luther King Jr Keynote Speaker is organized by The Be Series and the Dean of Students: Multicultural Education Engagement and Student...
January 25 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom

UO's 2022 Martin Luther King Jr Keynote Speaker is organized by The Be Series and the Dean of Students: Multicultural Education Engagement and Student Success

The BE Series (@uobeseries) brings together thinkers, makers, disrupters in every field to share their ideas on issues that really matter.

Doors: 5:30 pm

Presentation: 6:00-7:30 pm

A rising community leader, Payton Head is invested in developing institutional cultures that are grounded in equity. He empowers students and campus administrators to fight hatred with radical love for others and themselves.

Following the events in Ferguson, he spearheaded conversations about improving race relations in the state of Missouri. Head’s viral Facebook post detailing his experience with fighting systemic injustice at Mizzou ignited the student body to fight for a more inclusive campus and be a change agent in higher education. A rising community leader, Payton Head details the adversities caused by race, gender, and sexual orientation discrimination and proven solutions to facilitate open dialogue and embrace marginalized communities.

With passion about the theory of education and action in order to affect change, with the National Campus Leadership Council and the US Department of Education in 2016, he co-authored a guide for student leaders on strategy for addressing inclusion at educational institutions and presents to university communities nationwide on the importance of creating a culture of acceptance.

Head’s latest work has been internationally focused. He spent the summer of 2018 in Amsterdam and at the European Parliament in Strasbourg analyzing the rise of populism in the West. He also traveled to Israel and Palestine and learned from activists and lawmakers in Ramallah and Jerusalem about American solidarity in the ongoing conflict.

Head represents American youth of the African Diaspora with the United Nations International Decade for People of African Descent. In October 2019, he was selected to address the African Union and United Nations in Dakar, Senegal advocating for the investment in youth initiatives that unite young people of African Descent.

Payton has been featured on various outlets including The Melissa Harris-Perry Show, MSNBC, CNN, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post and Teen Vogue’s: How 3 Students Changed the Course of History at Their Schools amongst others. During his tenure at the University of Chicago, he served as communications director for UChicago’s Black Action in Public Policy Studies and Program Coordinator for the Inaugural Obama Foundation Scholar’s Master of Arts in International Development and Policy Program.

Head holds a bachelor’s degree in political science with certifications in leadership, multicultural and Black studies from the University of Missouri. He holds a master’s degree in public policy studies with certifications in global conflict and international development policy from the University of Chicago. He is a fall 2014 initiate of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated and a 2020 New Leaders Council Chicago Fellow. 

Jan 28
"Personal History" by Dominic Taylor7:30 p.m.

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated...
January 28–February 5
Miller Theatre Complex, Hope Theatre

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated pharmacist Eugene enters the world of the play in 1903, outraged that he is overqualified and underemployed. At an elegant parlor party hosted by his white business associate, Eugene scandalizes the other guests by challenging their comfortable liberalism. He also meets his future bride, Bethany, herself an accomplished business owner. As the action shifts from 1903 to the 1950s and eventually, to the 1990s, their relationship changes. The play is a snapshot of the history of African Americans and their struggles in this country.

Directed by Stanley Coleman

Dates: Jan. 28, 29, 30 (matinee), Feb. 4, 5

Produced by special arrangement with Playscripts, Inc. (www.playscripts.com)

 

$10 GA | $8 non-UO student/ UO faculty & staff/ senior | FREE for UO students with ID

https://tickets.uoregon.edu/personal-history

 

 

Jan 30
RO BIPOC XC Ski Trip8:00 a.m.

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project. Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips,...
January 30 8:00 a.m.
Outdoor Program (OP) Barn

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project. Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips, to provide a safe and comfortable environment for people to get outside with people who share similar identities!

We're going to be hosting a BIPOC student Affinity trip! In partnership with the Black Cultural Center we will be heading to Gold Lake Sno Park on a cross country ski outing! This is for participants of any level, whether you've never beeen cross country skiing before, or you're a seasoned winter adventurer!

Date: 1/30/22

Time: 8am

Level: 1 (open to beginners)

Location: Rental Barn

Cost: Free

Sign-up online with the google form, will be posted soon! Check our Instagram and website for updates. 

 

 

 

Feb 3
Ducks After Dark: Activities and Movie Night "Respect"7:15 p.m.

Join us to watch the Aretha Franklin film "Respect." Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks! FREE entry for UO students with a...
February 3 7:15 p.m.–10:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium room 214

Join us to watch the Aretha Franklin film "Respect."

Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks!

FREE entry for UO students with a valid UO ID!

Doors open/activity starts at 7:15 p.m.
Movie starts at 8:00 p.m.

Feb 7
BIPOC Leadership Workshop: The Influence of Culture in the Workplace 3:00 p.m.

“Leadership” is considered one of the core career readiness competencies for college students that lead to success in the workplace and lifelong career management. The...
February 7 3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Multicultural Center, room 109

“Leadership” is considered one of the core career readiness competencies for college students that lead to success in the workplace and lifelong career management. The truth of the matter is that leadership, as defined in the U.S., is not built for the success and retention of BIPOC individuals. BIPOC communities and cultures value collective thoughts and collaboration over individualism; connection, growth and community over professionalism; excellence over perfectionism; and storytelling and verbal communication over the written word. It’s time to change the narrative and bring BIPOC leadership into the spotlight!

In this interactive workshop facilitated by BIPOC Student Leaders from Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement, we invite you to reflect on leadership, culture, and identity as we examine the influence of culture in the workplace. We hope this will be a space for collective learning and you will walk away with a better understanding of how you can leverage your unique culture and identities to demonstrate BIPOC leadership skills for a better future.

 

Special thanks to the U.S. Department of State for sponsoring this workshop series.

Presented by: University Career Center & Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement

Feb 8
"Talking Black In America" Film Screening5:00 p.m.

The linguistics department will present the first of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This film talks about African American...
February 8 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, Room 156

The linguistics department will present the first of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This film talks about African American English, and it portrays the unique circumstances that shaped the language variety now spoken by the descendants of enslaved Africans brought to the U.S. and this group’s incredible impact on American life and language. The hope is to open people's eyes to language variation and validity of AAE in the US, and how speech varieties from the African American community reflect the imprint of African language systems, the influences of regional British and Southern American dialects, and the creativity and resilience of people living through oppression, segregation and the fight for equality.

Feb 9
Sistah Circle--Professional Development Support Group for Black Women in Graduate School5:00 p.m.

The Sistah Circle is a bi-monthly online support group meetings for Black Women in Graduate School at the UO Hosted by Bequita Pegram, a a life coach who enjoys...
February 9–May 11

The Sistah Circle is a bi-monthly online support group meetings for Black Women in Graduate School at the UO

Hosted by Bequita Pegram, a a life coach who enjoys helping high achievers develop their strengths in the areas of Determination, Optimism, Productivity, and Empowerment by sharing proven strategies. 

Meetings will be the second and fourth Wednesday of the month.

To register please fill out this sign up form

 

Feb 9
A’Lelia Bundles, UO Law School Derrick Bell Lecture | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 20225:30 p.m.

“Your First Duty Is to Humanity” – Echoes of Derrick Bell in Madam C. J. Walker’s Activism and Entrepreneurship About the speaker: Journalist and...
February 9 5:30 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 110

“Your First Duty Is to Humanity” – Echoes of Derrick Bell in Madam C. J. Walker’s Activism and Entrepreneurship

About the speaker:

Journalist and author A’Lelia Bundles’ is the biographer and great-great-granddaughter of early 20th century entrepreneur Madam C. J. Walker. She will discuss how Walker’s political activism and philanthropy informed her mindset of economic independence. As a journalist who links history and current events, she will examine the relationship of Walker’s advocacy of generational wealth for her sales agents to the systemic and structural racism that Derrick Bell revealed in Faces at the Bottom of the Well.

Bundles is author of On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker, which chronicles the life of her great-great-grandmother, a self-made millionaire. The New York Times Notable Book served as the inspiration for Self Made, the fictional four-part Netflix series.

Derrick Bell served as the first African American dean of the School of Law from 1980 to 1985. He is considered one of the most influential voices in the foundation of Critical Race Theory, a framework that examines society and culture as they connect to race, law, and power.

This annual event is a collaborative effort combining the School of Law’s Derrick Bell Lecture with the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, sponsored by the Office of the President and facilitated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion.

REGISTER AT: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/your-first-duty-is-to-humanity-annual-derrick-bell-lecture-tickets-230592377007

Feb 10
Preview the Career Fair12:30 p.m.

First career fair? Or just a little nervous? Come early and get a low-stress, behind-the-scenes look at how to navigate the fair and make a good first impression with employers!...
February 10 12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom (Lobby)

First career fair? Or just a little nervous? Come early and get a low-stress, behind-the-scenes look at how to navigate the fair and make a good first impression with employers! Join the University Career Center's Career Coaches right outside the EMU Ballrooms from 12:30-1 p.m. before the fair starts to get a pep talk and learn some helpful strategies to make the most of your time at the career fair--whether you've got 15 minutes or all afternoon to explore!

Feb 10
Lyllye B. Parker Black, Indigenous, Women of Color Speaker Series6:00 p.m.

A presentation and Q&A with a Notable Public Figure (name to be released as soon as the contract is signed)
February 10 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, 156

A presentation and Q&A with a Notable Public Figure
(name to be released as soon as the contract is signed)

Feb 10
Ducks After Dark: Activities and Movie Night "Black Panther"7:15 p.m.

Join us to watch the Marvel Cinematic Universe film "Black Panther."  Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks! FREE entry for...
February 10 7:15 p.m.–10:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium room 214

Join us to watch the Marvel Cinematic Universe film "Black Panther."  Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks!

FREE entry for UO students with a valid UO ID!

Doors open/activity starts at 7:15 p.m.
Movie starts at 8:00 p.m.

Sponsored by Counseling Center.

Feb 15
"Signing Black In America" Film Screening5:00 p.m.

The linguistics department will present the second of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This is the first film about Black...
February 15 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, Room 156

The linguistics department will present the second of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This is the first film about Black American Signed Language.

Feb 17
Ducks After Dark: Activities and Movie Night "King Richard"7:15 p.m.

Join us to watch the tennis film "King Richard." Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks! FREE entry for UO students with a valid...
February 17 7:15 p.m.–10:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium room 214

Join us to watch the tennis film "King Richard."

Rated PG-13. Popcorn and soda will be provided. See you there, Ducks!

FREE entry for UO students with a valid UO ID!

Doors open/activity starts at 7:15 p.m.
Movie starts at 8:00 p.m.

Feb 22
Claudia Schreier | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 2022

“Creating Passage: Reflections on Choreographing for Dance Theatre of Harlem” Choreographer Claudia Schreier has choreographed, directed, and produced for dance,...
February 22 12:00 a.m.

“Creating Passage: Reflections on Choreographing for Dance Theatre of Harlem”

Choreographer Claudia Schreier has choreographed, directed, and produced for dance, opera, and film across the U.S. and internationally. She will discuss the creative process for her 2019 ballet, 'Passage,' created for Dance Theatre of Harlem in recognition of the 400th anniversary of the arrival of enslaved Africans to Virginia. The work is the subject of the PBS Emmy Award-winning documentary, “Dancing on the Shoulders of Giants” (Capital Region). Set to a commissioned score by Jessie Montgomery, 'Passage' offers a moving reflection on the fortitude of the human spirit. Schreier will delve into bringing the ballet from concept to the stage and its connection to the legacy of legendary DTH founder Arthur Mitchell.

About the speaker:


Claudia Schreier is a choreographer who has been named Choreographer in Residence at Atlanta Ballet in 2020. She received a B.A. in Sociology and Secondary Degree in Dramatic Arts from Harvard University and trained at the Ballet School of Stamford. Schreier has received multiple awards for her work including the 2018 Princess Grace Award for Choreography and the 2018 NEFA National Dance Project Award. Her first work for Atlanta Ballet, First Impulse, was named a Standout Performance of 2019 by Pointe Magazine. She has been commissioned by many companies and organizations and has choreographed over 35 works. 

Watch WPA Virtual Commissions: Force of Habit by Claudia Schreierhttps here

Feb 22
BE Sports with Drake Hills5:30 p.m.

BE Sports is organized by The BE Series The BE Series (@uobeseries) brings together thinkers, makers, disrupters in every field to share their ideas on issues that...
February 22 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom

BE Sports is organized by The BE Series

The BE Series (@uobeseries) brings together thinkers, makers, disrupters in every field to share their ideas on issues that really matter.

Doors: 5:30pm

Presentation: 6pm-7:30pm

 

Drake Hills is a Major League Soccer reporter for the USA TODAY Network and is based in Nashville. Drake covers Nashville SC in MLS, the Black Players for Change coalition and international soccer. He is a 2018 alumnus of the University of Oregon and School of Journalism and Communication and is driven by telling Black stories within the realm of soccer to illuminate the representation of Black men and women in the sport, while advocating for affordable and resourceful opportunities for Black youth to participate. Drake is passionate about the intersection of sport, race and culture and will discuss his work as it pertains to intersectionality in sport and his pathway into the sports media industry. 

 

Instagram: @drakehillssoccer
Facebook: drakehillssoccer
Linkedin: Drake Hills
Twitter: @LiveLifeDrake

Feb 23
Sistah Circle--Professional Development Support Group for Black Women in Graduate School5:00 p.m.

The Sistah Circle is a bi-monthly online support group meetings for Black Women in Graduate School at the UO Hosted by Bequita Pegram, a a life coach who enjoys...
February 23–April 27

The Sistah Circle is a bi-monthly online support group meetings for Black Women in Graduate School at the UO

Hosted by Bequita Pegram, a a life coach who enjoys helping high achievers develop their strengths in the areas of Determination, Optimism, Productivity, and Empowerment by sharing proven strategies. 

Meetings will be the second and fourth Wednesday of the month.

To register please fill out this sign up form

 

Mar 8
William Darity and Kirsten Mullen | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021-225:30 p.m.

“Reconstruction, Redress and Redistributive Justice” William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen will build a case for reparations that includes, but goes beyond,...
March 8 5:30 p.m.

“Reconstruction, Redress and Redistributive Justice”

William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen will build a case for reparations that includes, but goes beyond, ‘slavery reparations.’ They will provide a strategy for a reparations plan. They also will talk about their award-winning publication, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century (UNC Press, 2020).

About the speakers:

Dr. William Darity Jr. and Ms. A. Kristen Mullen co-authored From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century. Their book confronts injustices head-on and makes the most comprehensive case to date for economic reparations for U.S. descendants of slavery. William Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics and the founding director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. A. Kirsten Mullen is a writer, folklorist, and museum consultant. She is the founder of Artefactual, an arts-consulting practice, and Carolina Circuit Writers, a literary consortium that brings expressive writers of color to the Carolinas. 

Apr 12
CSWS Noon Talk with Cornesha Tweede, Romance Languagesnoon

“A Feminist Approach to the Early Modern Literary Canon”: This talk will focus on Maria de Zayas’s literary archive of women’s amorous experiences in her...
April 12 noon

“A Feminist Approach to the Early Modern Literary Canon”: This talk will focus on Maria de Zayas’s literary archive of women’s amorous experiences in her collection of stories, Desengaños Amorosos. While focusing on Zayas and her literary corpus, Tweede will explore how women during the early modern era interacted with a patriarchal and imperialistic society. Specifically, the presentation will analyze a black African woman in the collection of stories and bring forward her presence within the prose narrative. With both a feminist and Black feminist approach, Tweede will argue that women literary characters and black African women literary characters play a major role within the plot and direction of the prose narrative’s story line.

May 16
Imagining Futures lecture: Charles Chavis, Jr.5:30 p.m.

Charles Chavis, Jr. is the Founding Director of the John Mitchell, Jr. Program for History, Justice, and Race at George Mason University’s Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter...
May 16 5:30 p.m.

Charles Chavis, Jr. is the Founding Director of the John Mitchell, Jr. Program for History, Justice, and Race at George Mason University’s Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, where he is also an Assistant Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution and History.

Dr. Chavis is a historian and museum educator whose work focuses on the history of racial violence and civil rights activism and Black and Jewish relations in the American South, and the ways in which the historical understandings of racial violence and civil rights activism can inform current and future approaches to peacebuilding and conflict resolution throughout the world.

He is editor of For the Sake of Peace: Africana Perspectives on Racism, Justice, and Peace in America (2020). His upcoming book, The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State (forthcoming 2022).