Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Apply Now: Black Cultural Center Scholarships

Award allocations are based on academic classification, but range from $750–$6,000; available for incoming first-year students through graduate and law students.

Donate: Advancing the Mission of the Black Cultural Center

 

Umoja Black Scholars Academic Residential Community

Umoja Black Scholars image

 

Umoja, “unity” in Swahili, is a community that aims to cultivate a sense of belonging for Black students at the University of Oregon. This community is designed to meet the social and academic needs of Black students through fostering an understanding of and respect for Black cultures, identities, and histories. The Umoja Black Scholars ARC brings Black students who live and take courses together, and can grow in their own identities, engage with peer mentors, and connect with cultural, social, and academic resources.

Applications for the 2022–23 Umoja Black Scholars cohort are open now through May 31, 2022.

Learn About Umoja Black Scholars

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Black Cultural Center

1870 East 15th Avenue

SPRING TERM HOURS
Sunday: 1:30–4:30 p.m.
Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

Get Connected

If you are interested in staying up to date about what’s going on with the BCC, please provide your name and email using our online form to be added to our mailing list.


Collaboration and Advertisements?

We invite the UO campus and greater Oregon community to advertise programs, events, and job opportunities via the Shades of Black Newsletter and BCC social media.


BCC Space Reservations

Looking to host your next meeting, campus visit, or other event? Submit a request at least 72 hours in advance. Currently we are not available for Saturday reservations.

Our Mission

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is the engine for Black students’ academic success at the University of Oregon. The BCC is a welcoming and supportive space that helps Black students harness the resources necessary to navigate their social, cultural, and academic experience. By investing in the success of Black students, the BCC enhances the cultural and social development of the entire University of Oregon community.

UO Black Lives Matter


Black Cultural Center Opening from University of Oregon on Vimeo.


About Lyllye Reynolds-Parker

Ms. Parker earned her BA in sociology from the UO in 1991. She worked at the UO as an academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success for 17 years, until she retired.

Ms. Parker has served on multiple advisory committees. She also serves on the board of a local nonprofit, the League of United Latin American Citizens, where she is the honorary chair of their Anti-Racial Profiling Committee.

The UO’s Women’s Center hosts an annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of Color Speaker Series to bring female speakers of color to campus.

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Aris Hall, PhD
Coordinator, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Events

Jan 29
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 1
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 1
Screening and Discussion of "The March" 5:30 p.m.

Watch James Blue’s award-winning film, The March, with an introduction by University of Oregon Professor Emeritus David Frank and cinema studies student Joie Littleton....
Screening and Discussion of "The March"
February 1
5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Watch James Blue’s award-winning film, The March, with an introduction by University of Oregon Professor Emeritus David Frank and cinema studies student Joie Littleton. James Blue’s The March (1964) is a humanistic and poetic 33-minute film of the August 28, 1963, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, produced and distributed to 83 foreign countries by the United States Information Agency (USIA). Q & A to follow.

Frank is a Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric, an Andrew W. Mellon grant recipient, and creator of the online exhibition The March. Littleton is the Andrew W. Mellon Research Intern graduating in Spring 2023 with a double major in cinema studies and public relations. The program will be introduced by Sherri Jones, Assistant Administrator of Education.

Feb 2
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 3
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 4
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 5
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 7
“The Intersection of Art and Social Justice” 5:30 p.m.

Cartoonist Keith Knight takes a deep dive on 20 artists who inspired him to use his art to address social issues. Folks like Ollie Harrington, Langston Hughes, Octavia Butler,...
“The Intersection of Art and Social Justice”
February 7
5:30 p.m.

Cartoonist Keith Knight takes a deep dive on 20 artists who inspired him to use his art to address social issues. Folks like Ollie Harrington, Langston Hughes, Octavia Butler, Oscar Michaux, James Baldwin, alongside current artists like Dread Scott, Public Enemy, and Fly.

Keith Knight is a cartoonist and author of the comic strips The K Chronicles, (Th)ink, and The Knight Life. As a public speaker, Knight presents comic strip slideshows addressing racial illiteracy and police brutality and the role it has played since the early years of the United States. He is a co-creator and co-writer of Hulu’s streaming series Woke, based on The K Chronicles and Knight’s life. Knight is part of a generation of African-American artists who were raised on hip-hop, and infuse their work with urgency, edge, humor, satire, politics, and race. His art has appeared in various publications, including the New Yorker, the Washington Post, Daily KOS, San Francisco Chronicle, Medium.com, Ebony, ESPN the Magazine, L.A. Weekly, MAD Magazine, and the Funny Times.

Feb 8
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Feb 8
Artist Talk: Lonnie Graham    5:30 p.m.

 Lonnie Graham committed to a life in the arts in 1960. Professor Graham will present a visual documentation of his work and its...
Artist Talk: Lonnie Graham   
February 8
5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

 Lonnie Graham committed to a life in the arts in 1960.

Professor Graham will present a visual documentation of his work and its evolution through his commitment to photography to his cultivation as a cultural activist. During the presentation Graham will provide examples from the Spirit House series, the Memorialization series produced for the Spoleto Festival and Current Eulogies being performed in Georgia and South Sudan. In addition, Professor Graham will provide insight into the Conversation with the World project currently on view at the JSMA.