Donate: Advancing the Mission of the Black Cultural Center

Virtual Engagement

We are committed to maintaining high levels of support and resources for our students. During this time, the BCC and Dean of Students staff will continue to check and respond to voicemails and emails. In addition, the BCC will continue to offer resource navigation and support remotely, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. To reach the coordinator of the BCC, call 541-346-6321 or email arish@uoregon.edu if you need assistance. To reach the Dean of Students crisis team, call 541-346-3216.

Refer to the site below for official updates regarding the University of Oregon’s response to COVID-19, including frequently asked questions.

During fall term 2020 the university will be offering learning primarily online and remotely. While we may not be able to engage with one another within the BCC, we do welcome students to connect with the Black Cultural Center staff virtually. Please join us on social media and Zoom for events such as Black Grad Writing Circle, Virtual Super Soul Tuesdays, Nuanced Griot: Community Conversations, and other virtual interactions and programming.

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Black Cultural Center

While the LRP Black Cultural Center will be closed for fall term 2020 due to state and university guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still supporting students in person and remotely.

The outside porch of the BCC will be available to a limited number of students during Dr. Aris Hall's office hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1:00–4:00 p.m.; and Thursdays, 9:00 a.m.–noon.

1870 East 15th Avenue
Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. (offering services remotely)

Get Connected

If you are interested in staying up to date about what’s going on with the BCC, please provide your name and email using our online form to be added to our mailing list.

Contact Us

 
Aris Hall, PhD
Coordinator, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center


Our Mission

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is the engine for Black students’ academic success at the University of Oregon. The BCC is a welcoming and supportive space that helps Black students harness the resources necessary to navigate their social, cultural, and academic experience. By investing in the success of Black students, the BCC enhances the cultural and social development of the entire University of Oregon community.


Black Cultural Center Opening from University of Oregon on Vimeo.

Umoja Black Scholars Community

The Umoja Residential Community is a space in the residence halls where Black students can come together, grow in their own identities, engage with peer mentors, and connect with academic advising and resources.

Applications for the Umoja Black Scholars Community will open in March 2021 for the 2021–2022 academic year.

Learn About Umoja Black Scholars


About Lyllye Reynolds-Parker

Lyllye Reynolds-ParkerLyllye Reynolds-Parker was born in Eugene in 1946 and was a member of the first graduating class of Henry D. Sheldon High School. Ms. Parker started her social justice work while in high school, being actively involved with the civil rights movement here. She was vice president of the local Student Non-violence Committee, an organization founded by Stokely Carmichael, an internationally known civil rights advocate.

Ms. Parker earned her BA in sociology from the UO in 1991. She worked at the UO as an academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success for 17 years, until she retired.

Ms. Parker has served on multiple advisory committees. She also serves on the board of a local nonprofit, the League of United Latin American Citizens, where she is the honorary chair of their Anti-Racial Profiling Committee.

The UO’s Women’s Center hosts an annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of Color Speaker Series to bring female speakers of color to campus.


Events

Feb 26
LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act.

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common...
January 27–June 14

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common Seeing exhibition that explores and expands on the Common Reading through visual art. The 2020-21 novel is This is My America by UO Assistant Vice Provost for Advising, Kimberly Johnson. The Common Reading’s charge of Listen. Learn. Act. incorporates different bodies of work across multiple platforms, focusing on Blackness, Black experience, and dismantling racism. The works on view in this year’s Common Seeing, on loan from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, are by Black American artists Hank Willis Thomas (American, b. 1976) and Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Their art compels us to look, listen, learn, and act.

The JSMA believes that art can move people to change. As an academic art museum, it is critical for us to listen, learn, and act in order to build trust and understanding. We are committed to the advancement of anti-racism in museum culture and diverse and equitable approaches in our work. The JSMA’s exhibitions and public programs strive to amplify multiple perspectives, experiences, and voices. LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act. is generously made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation.

 

Image: Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Sorrow’s Kitchen (detail), 2020. Wood, tin, acrylics, spray tar, ceiling tin and linoleum, 28 x 12 x 10 in. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer (Photo Credit: L.A. Louver).  

 

Feb 26
All Sizes Fit Art Recruitment8:00 a.m.

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All...
February 1–26

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All Sizes Fit focuses on three principles:

Attention: Be in touch with your body and its signals. Your body is excellent at regulating and letting you know what it needs in order to perform optimally.
Appreciation: Appreciate everything your body allows you to do and the pleasure it provides. It is because of your body that you can engage in the activities you love and enjoy what life has to offer.
Acceptance: Accept all the assets you have rather than longing for what you do not. Much of your body composition is predetermined by your genetics.

Please submit this form if you would like to enter the 2021 All Sizes Fit Virtual Art Show. Your submission should be a representation of body positivity, body acceptance, body image, and/or All Sizes Fit. If you plan to enter more than one piece, please fill out this form for each piece.

https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9sK3KbpAMOuELsy

All entries due by Friday, February 26, 2021. After we receive your piece digitally we will send another form for you to complete where you can share more about your piece (e.g. title, artist statement, etc.)

1st Place Prize: $100 Duck Store Gift Certificate
2nd Place Prize: $75 Duck Store Gift Certificate
3rd Place Prize: $50 Duck Store Gift Certificate
Honorable Mentions (10): $10 Duck Store Gift Certificates

For any questions please contact Suzie Stadelman at sstadelm@uoregon.edu

We will accept entries from non-UO students, but only current UO students are eligible to win prizes. All entries will be screened to make sure they don't contain triggering or inappropriate imagery.

Feb 26
Teresa Goddu: The (Neo)Slave Narrative and the Plantationocenenoon

African American literature—very little of which is read as climate fiction—has long articulated the intersections between plantation slavery’s environmental and...
February 26 noon

African American literature—very little of which is read as climate fiction—has long articulated the intersections between plantation slavery’s environmental and racial regimes and, more recently, traced the plantation’s ecological and social histories directly to the climate crisis. This essay looks to the slave narrative and the contemporary neo-slave narrative to trace the long history of the Plantationocene as well as the alternative ecologies of resistance and repair this literature encodes.

Teresa Goddu is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of Selling Anti-Slavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America and Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation.

Zoom link: https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/96477704328

Click here to request a copy of the precirculated paper

Feb 26
UOTeach-In on Educational Equity & Anti-Oppressive Pedagogies4:00 p.m.

The UOTeach teacher licensure and Sapsik’wałá programs have collaborated with a host of campus and national scholars to offer a weeklong UOTeachIN on educational...
February 22–27

The UOTeach teacher licensure and Sapsik’wałá programs have collaborated with a host of campus and national scholars to offer a weeklong UOTeachIN on educational equity.

Each Monday-Friday evening offers two sessions which approach anti-oppressive pedagogy from their respective equity lenses; including Love Authenticity Courage Empathy LACE, All Students Belong, indigenous resilience practices, 1619 teaching hard history, anticolonial teaching, trauma-informed, technology agency, This is My America, Latinx community, and bilingual/bicultural education.

UOTeachIN culminates Saturday, Feb 27 at 1:00 p.m. with our keynote speaker, Dr. Bettina Love, author of We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and The Pursuit of Educational Freedom, and co-founder of the Abolitionist Teaching Network. Dr. Love will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom, as opposed to reform, and moving beyond what she calls the educational survival complex.

Mar 2
Freeman A. Hrabowski, III: African American Workshop and Lecture Series5:30 p.m.

The Empowered University: Shared Leadership, Culture Change, and Academic Success  REGISTER HERE Freeman Hrabowski has served as President of The University of...
March 2 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

The Empowered University: Shared Leadership, Culture Change, and Academic Success 

REGISTER HERE

Freeman Hrabowski has served as President of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the 2011 report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He was named in 2012 by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. His 2013 TED talk highlights the “Four Pillars of College Success in Science.”

Watch a video clip about Freeman Hrabowski

Mar 3
Let's (Tele)Talk: Black Student Support2:00 p.m.

Talk with a Black/African American Specialist and Therapist Dr. Nikki Chery will be available on Wednesdays from 2-4 p.m. She is a psychologist who focuses on the...
January 6–March 10

Talk with a Black/African American Specialist and Therapist

Dr. Nikki Chery will be available on Wednesdays from 2-4 p.m. She is a psychologist who focuses on the needs of Black/African American students.
Click here for Waiting Room
 
What is Let’s (Tele)Talk?

Let’s Talk is a drop-in service that provides easy access to free, informal confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services counselor.
 
What makes Let’s (Tele)Talk different from counseling services at UCS?


No appointment necessary (first-come, first served)
No paperwork to be completed
Easy access support and consultation


 
Let’s (Tele)Talk is especially helpful for students who:


Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it
Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling
Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like
Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists
Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do


 
How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will now be offered via Zoom. Click on the relevant link below to access a Zoom meeting with a Let’s (Tele)Talk counselor. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the counselor is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and is meant to be used on an as-needed basis.

Mar 4
Community Conversations: Joint Event, Student, Alumni, Staff, Faculty6:00 p.m.

In the fall, CEI hosted a series titled Community Conversations for Diverse Voices in Music and Dance during the Week of Welcome. The meetings were a success, and we are...
March 4 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

In the fall, CEI hosted a series titled Community Conversations for Diverse Voices in Music and Dance during the Week of Welcome. The meetings were a success, and we are excited about our ongoing work to create safe spaces for students, alumni, faculty and staff from marginalized communities at the SOMD this Winter 2021 and into perpetuity. 

 
If you are a student, alumni, faculty and or staff who identifies as a person of color and/or a member of the LGBTQ+ and would like to attend the upcoming events, please fill out this Qualtrics form or copy and paste this URL into your internet browser:  

https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_7NWg9STkhMMte5L 

 We look forward to seeing you!

Mar 10
Personal History

by Dominic Taylor Directed by Stanley Coleman Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a...
March 10–14

by Dominic Taylor

Directed by Stanley Coleman

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated pharmacist Eugene enters the world of the play in 1903, outraged that he is overqualified and underemployed. At an elegant parlor party hosted by his white business associate, Eugene scandalizes the other guests by challenging their comfortable liberalism. He also meets his future bride, Bethany, herself an accomplished business owner. Toying with time, the play has the couple moving into this same home in an exclusive all-white neighborhood in the early 1950s. Race and class are further jumbled as the action shifts to the 1990s -- the house is now a chic restaurant where Eugene and Bethany, divorced years earlier, have their final transformative encounter.

Our production will be streaming with Broadway On Demand in March for your viewing convenience. Please visit our website for more details: https://theatre.uoregon.edu/2020/09/14/virtual-event-calendar/

 

Produced by special arrangement with Playscripts, Inc. (www.playscripts.com)

Mar 30
Study Abroad Fair10:00 a.m.

That's right! Applications are now open for travel-based study abroad programs in summer and fall terms in 2021. This four-day virtual event offers drop-in sessions daily...
March 30–April 2

That's right! Applications are now open for travel-based study abroad programs in summer and fall terms in 2021.

This four-day virtual event offers drop-in sessions daily for students to discover how they can travel this summer, study abroad around the world, and earn academic credit toward general studies, major, minor, and elective requirements. Meet financial aid, academic advisors, study abroad alumni, and more! Learn more and register for the Zoom link.

Spring Term, Week 1
Tuesday, March 30 - Friday, April 2
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. daily
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday – Thursday

Sessions include:

COVID-19: Health & Safety Abroad
Virtual Internships
Summer 2021
Just Exploring
How Will I Pay for This?
Academics of Study Abroad: Credits
Non-Travel Global Engagement Programs
Virtual Homestays and Language Partners
Meet the GEO Site Director in Italy
Meet the GEO Site Directors in Spain
Meet the GEO Site Director in London
Where Can I Study Abroad with GEO? 
Opportunities to Go Abroad with UO Faculty
Going Green: GEO Sustainable
Passport to Professionalism
Play Global Bingo (with prizes!)
Ducks Abroad: Conversations with Alumni
GEO Elements for the Classroom (faculty only)
Parent to Parent Q&A (Open to all family members)