What will your story be?

What you do on campus and how you get involved in our communities is entirely up to you. Every year begins with the networking event Weaving New Beginnings, where you can find opportunities and a community to support you. Do you want to focus on building strong relationships through a program focused on succeeding at the UO? Or maybe you want to be involved in celebrating legacy and cultural heritage through major events on campus. Whatever your interests are, there are opportunities and a community for you. You get to choose how your successful college experience is defined. The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success staff is here to help you get there.


Multicultural Events and Programs

Throughout the year there are a variety of events and programs hosted by students and community members focused on sharing experiences and discussions around culture and heritage with the campus community.

IMPACT

IMPACT is a peer-to-peer mentoring program for students of color and first-generation college students. Students can participate as either a new student or as an IMPACT coordinator.

Weaving New Beginnings

A networking reception to welcome new students, faculty, and staff of color. This event has kicked off our fall term for more than 25 years and has become an exciting campus tradition. All are welcome. 

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

Every year the campus comes together to celebrate the lasting legacy of Dr. King's work. With award celebrations, a community march, service project, and a keynote speaker this celebration brings our community together to honor our shared vision to continue moving forward and pays tribute to the individuals who have bravely stood for justice and peace.

Raices Unida Youth Conference

Latinx high schoolers from around the state of Oregon gather for a full-day conference to connect with each other and learn about access to higher education.

Heritage and History Events

During Heritage and History Months, students, faculty, and staff come together to celebrate the stories, cultures, traditions, and experiences of various cultures.


Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success Hours

Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Creating a common dialogue

The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success program is a place where all students are welcome to meet, plan, and help create a stronger community. It is a place that helps you connect with students of all races and backgrounds to collaborate around cultural programming and education. Our office leads IMPACT and collaborates on a number of events and celebrations throughout the year.


Resources

The Division of Student Life—as well as many offices and programs in the Division of Equity and Inclusion—work closely with a number of campus services to connect you with resources, services, and community. Below are a number of resources you might find helpful.


Events

Jan 16
2021-22 Common Seeing: Meeting Points

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common...
October 14 2021–April 10 2022

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common Seeing expands this conversation through the visual arts.

The 2021-22 selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, addresses humanity’s responsibility to the natural world through its author’s observations as an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, academically trained botanist, and mother. Kimmerer calls for a reciprocal relationship between people and nature that prioritizes generosity and respects the needs of all living things. Her memoir’s interwoven topics include ecology, parenting, Indigenous land and water rights, traditional foodways, good citizenship, sustainability, climate change, and the preservation of language.

This year’s Common Seeing brings together works by nine contemporary Native artists that speak to these issues and each’s experiences as individuals and members of their communities. Featured artists include Natalie Ball (American, Black, Modoc and Klamath), Joe Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes), Bud Lane (Siletz), Joey Lavadour (Walla Walla/Métis), Brenda Mallory (Cherokee), Lillian Pitt (Warm Springs, Wasco, and Yakama), Gail Tremblay (Mi'kmaq and Onondaga), Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), and Shirod Younker (Coquille, Coos, and Umpqua, b. 1972). JSMA is especially grateful to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History for lending work from their collection. 

For more information about the UO’s Common Reading and to find out how members of the UO Community can access a digital copy of Braiding Sweetgrass, visit https://fyp.uoregon.edu/common-reading-2021-2022-braiding-sweetgrass.

 

The JSMA is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world. In following the Indigenous protocol of acknowledging the original people of the land we occupy, we also extend our respect to the nine federally recognized Indigenous nations of Oregon: the Burns Paiute Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, and the Klamath Tribes. We express our respect to the many more tribes who have ancestral connections to this territory, as well as to all other displaced Indigenous peoples who call Oregon home.

 

Gail Tremblay (American, Mi'kmaq, and Onondaga, b. 1945), 2018. 1981 Film Irony: Trying to Have an American Film in Cheyenne Native Language Judged in the Foreign Film Category for the Oscars (Even the Academy Rejected the Proposal), 2018. 35mm film (from “Windwalker," 1981), red and white film leader, silver braid 24 x 14 x 14 in. Museum Purchase through the Edna Pearl Horton Memorial Endowment. (Image courtesy of the Artist and Froelick Gallery; photography by Mario Gallucci.)

Jan 16
Queer & Neurodivergent Identity Subgroup5:00 p.m.

This is the identity subgroup for LGBTQ+ neurodivergent UO students! This subgroup is a communal space for students who are somewhere on the LGBTQ+ spectrum (which includes...
January 16–March 13

This is the identity subgroup for LGBTQ+ neurodivergent UO students!

This subgroup is a communal space for students who are somewhere on the LGBTQ+ spectrum (which includes those who are questioning) and are also not neurotypical.

 

The term neurodivergent is an umbrella term including anybody with:



Mental illnesses
Learning/intellectual/neurological disabilities and/or disorders
Personality disorders
Emotional/mental/psychological trauma
Different neurotypes than the norm
Physical trauma to the brain
...And more!


 

We meet once every two weeks over the UO LGBTQIA+ Discord Server! To gain access to the server, fill out this form here: https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5jdSlf3KXEuduOW

Jan 17
MLK Day of Service 2022 9:00 a.m.

The Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement invites you to join us for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service as we honor the legacy of Dr. King by serving...
January 17 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Global Scholars Hall, Great Room

The Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement invites you to join us for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service as we honor the legacy of Dr. King by serving the local community and focusing on educating ourselves about racial justice in K-12, locally and nationally, and exploring the impacts for the future. Make sure to register on Engage (link can be found here: https://holden.uoregon.edu/daysofservice). Only folks who have registered will be provided a lunch. Check in begins at 8:45 AM.

MLK Day of Service is sponsored by University Housing, RHA, and NRHH. 

Contact Us

 
DJ Kelly-Quattrocchi
Coordinator, Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success