Multicultural Events and Programming

IMPACT students playing a game on the Living-Learning Center lawn.
Multicultural Events and Programming

What Will Your Story Be?

What you do on campus and how you get involved in our communities is entirely up to you. Every year begins with the networking event Weaving New Beginnings, where you can find opportunities and a community to support you. Do you want to focus on building strong relationships through a program focused on succeeding at the UO? Or maybe you want to be involved in celebrating legacy and cultural heritage through major events on campus. Whatever your interests are, there are opportunities and a community for you. You get to choose how your successful college experience is defined. The Multicultural Events and Programming team is here to help you get there.


Multicultural Events and Programs

Throughout the year there are a variety of events and programs hosted by students and community members focused on sharing experiences and discussions around culture and heritage with the campus community.

Weaving New Beginnings

A networking reception to welcome new students, faculty, and staff of color. This event has kicked off our fall term for more than 25 years and has become an exciting campus tradition. All are welcome. 

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

Every year the campus comes together to celebrate the lasting legacy of Dr. King's work. With award celebrations, a community march, service project, and a keynote speaker this celebration brings our community together to honor our shared vision to continue moving forward and pays tribute to the individuals who have bravely stood for justice and peace.

Raices Unida Youth Conference

Latinx high schoolers from around the state of Oregon gather for a full-day conference to connect with each other and learn about access to higher education.

Heritage and History Events

During Heritage and History Months, students, faculty, and staff come together to celebrate the stories, cultures, traditions, and experiences of various cultures.

 

DOS Multicultural Events and Programming Team Hours

Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

 

Creating a common dialogue

The Office of the Dean of Students Multicultural Events and Programming team provides a place where all students are welcome to meet, plan, and help create a stronger community. It is a place that helps you connect with students of all races and backgrounds to collaborate around cultural programming and education. Our team collaborates on several events and celebrations throughout the year.

Resources

The Division of Student Life—as well as many offices and programs in the Division of Equity and Inclusion—work closely with a number of campus services to connect you with resources, services, and community. Below are a number of resources you might find helpful.

Events

Jan 29
Outliers and Outlaws: Stories from the Eugene Lesbian History Project 10:00 a.m.

In the 1960s – 1990s, hundreds of young women who identified as lesbians came to Eugene. They founded organization's central to the city and provided leadership for...
Outliers and Outlaws: Stories from the Eugene Lesbian History Project
January 28–December 31
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

In the 1960s – 1990s, hundreds of young women who identified as lesbians came to Eugene. They founded organization's central to the city and provided leadership for community service agencies. They created lesbian magazines, photographs, music, films, dance performances, theater, and art. They influenced Oregon's political landscape and contributed to the larger LGBTQ movement.

Come discover stories about the Eugene lesbian community from the women who created and sustained it.

Jan 29
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

Jan 31
Native Studies Research Colloquium—Elakha Alliance Tribal Youth Internship Overview: Creating A Cultural Traveling Display 3:00 p.m.

Have you ever seen a sea otter on the Oregon Coast before? Most likely, the answer is no. Sea otters are locally extinct along the Oregon Coast today, primarily due to overkill...
Native Studies Research Colloquium—Elakha Alliance Tribal Youth Internship Overview: Creating A Cultural Traveling Display
January 31
3:00–4:30 p.m.
Many Nations Longhouse

Have you ever seen a sea otter on the Oregon Coast before? Most likely, the answer is no. Sea otters are locally extinct along the Oregon Coast today, primarily due to overkill during the fur trade.

The Elakha Alliance is a non-profit organization working to reintroduce sea otters to Oregon. As an Elakha Alliance Tribal Youth Intern, third-year student Kaitlynn Spino helped to create a cultural traveling display that will travel along the coast. The display will provide a blast to the past with historical images and information, as well as a view of what our future could look like with sea otters as part of the ecosystem. Join Kaitlynn Spino for a conversation surrounding her experience, including how she created space for Indigenous languages while exploring the possibility of reintroducing the ancestors, sea otters, of many Oregon Indigenous tribes.

Feb 1
Outliers and Outlaws: Stories from the Eugene Lesbian History Project 10:00 a.m.

In the 1960s – 1990s, hundreds of young women who identified as lesbians came to Eugene. They founded organization's central to the city and provided leadership for...
Outliers and Outlaws: Stories from the Eugene Lesbian History Project
January 28–December 31
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

In the 1960s – 1990s, hundreds of young women who identified as lesbians came to Eugene. They founded organization's central to the city and provided leadership for community service agencies. They created lesbian magazines, photographs, music, films, dance performances, theater, and art. They influenced Oregon's political landscape and contributed to the larger LGBTQ movement.

Come discover stories about the Eugene lesbian community from the women who created and sustained it.

Feb 1
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World" 11:00 a.m.

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s...
Lonnie Graham’s "A Conversation with the World"
October 15–April 2
11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Lonnie Graham is a photographer, installation artist, and cultural activist investigating methods by which the arts may be used to achieve tangible meaning in people’s lives. Based in Philadelphia, he is a Professor of Visual Art at Pennsylvania State University and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pennsylvania Council for the Arts. For more than three decades, he has created a series of photographs titled Conversation with the World. Last year Graham generously donated seventeen prints from the series to the JSMA.

A Conversation with the World comprises work done in Africa, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and the Americas. Graham meets individuals and, through mutual trust, makes a portrait and records a conversation. Regardless of age, gender or nationality, all were asked the same eight questions pertaining to origins, family, life, death, values, tradition, and thoughts on Western Culture. Their individual portraits and responses make up the content of the project that the artist hopes will “delve beneath the superficial patina of cultural differences to explore the essential and fundamental motivations of human beings in order to clearly illustrate the bond that is inherently our humanity.”

DJ Kelly-Quattrocchi
Coordinator, Multicultural and Identity-Based Support Services