Donate: Advancing the Mission of the Black Cultural Center

2021 Black Grad Ceremony

Congratulations to the Class of 2021 Black Grads!

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, the Black Student Union, and the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence celebrate and recognize our Black graduates in a virtual ceremony.

Register for the Black Grad Ceremony

Announcing the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center Scholarships

Individual awards will range between $750–$5,000. Apply now through May 14, 2021.

Virtual Engagement

We are committed to maintaining high levels of support and resources for our students. During this time, the BCC and Dean of Students staff will continue to check and respond to voicemails and emails. In addition, the BCC will continue to offer resource navigation and support remotely, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. To reach the coordinator of the BCC, call 541-346-6321 or email arish@uoregon.edu if you need assistance. To reach the Dean of Students crisis team, call 541-346-3216.

Refer to the site below for official updates regarding the University of Oregon’s response to COVID-19, including frequently asked questions.

During the 2020–21 academic year, the university will be offering learning primarily online and remotely. While we may not be able to engage with one another within the BCC, we do welcome students to connect with the Black Cultural Center staff virtually. Please join us on social media and Zoom for events such as Virtual Super Soul Tuesdays and other virtual interactions and programming.

Umoja Black Scholars Academic Residential Community

Umoja Black Scholars image

The Umoja Black Scholars ARC is a space in the residence halls where Black students can come together, grow in their own identities, engage with peer mentors, and connect with academic advising and resources.

Applications for the 2021–22 Umoja Black Scholars cohort are open now through May 31, 2021.

Learn About Umoja Black Scholars

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Black Cultural Center

While the LRP Black Cultural Center will be closed for fall term 2020 due to state and university guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still supporting students in person and remotely.

The outside porch of the BCC will be available to a limited number of students during Dr. Aris Hall's office hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1:00–4:00 p.m.; and Thursdays, 9:00 a.m.–noon.

1870 East 15th Avenue
Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. (offering services remotely)

Get Connected

If you are interested in staying up to date about what’s going on with the BCC, please provide your name and email using our online form to be added to our mailing list.


Our Mission

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is the engine for Black students’ academic success at the University of Oregon. The BCC is a welcoming and supportive space that helps Black students harness the resources necessary to navigate their social, cultural, and academic experience. By investing in the success of Black students, the BCC enhances the cultural and social development of the entire University of Oregon community.


Black Cultural Center Opening from University of Oregon on Vimeo.

UO Black Lives Matter


About Lyllye Reynolds-Parker

Lyllye Reynolds-ParkerLyllye Reynolds-Parker was born in Eugene in 1946 and was a member of the first graduating class of Henry D. Sheldon High School. Ms. Parker started her social justice work while in high school, being actively involved with the civil rights movement here. She was vice president of the local Student Non-violence Committee, an organization founded by Stokely Carmichael, an internationally known civil rights advocate.

Ms. Parker earned her BA in sociology from the UO in 1991. She worked at the UO as an academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success for 17 years, until she retired.

Ms. Parker has served on multiple advisory committees. She also serves on the board of a local nonprofit, the League of United Latin American Citizens, where she is the honorary chair of their Anti-Racial Profiling Committee.

The UO’s Women’s Center hosts an annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of Color Speaker Series to bring female speakers of color to campus.

Contact Us

 
Aris Hall, PhD
Coordinator, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center


Events

Apr 21
LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act.

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common...
January 27–June 14

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common Seeing exhibition that explores and expands on the Common Reading through visual art. The 2020-21 novel is This is My America by UO Assistant Vice Provost for Advising, Kimberly Johnson. The Common Reading’s charge of Listen. Learn. Act. incorporates different bodies of work across multiple platforms, focusing on Blackness, Black experience, and dismantling racism. The works on view in this year’s Common Seeing, on loan from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, are by Black American artists Hank Willis Thomas (American, b. 1976) and Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Their art compels us to look, listen, learn, and act.

The JSMA believes that art can move people to change. As an academic art museum, it is critical for us to listen, learn, and act in order to build trust and understanding. We are committed to the advancement of anti-racism in museum culture and diverse and equitable approaches in our work. The JSMA’s exhibitions and public programs strive to amplify multiple perspectives, experiences, and voices. LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act. is generously made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation.

 

Image: Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Sorrow’s Kitchen (detail), 2020. Wood, tin, acrylics, spray tar, ceiling tin and linoleum, 28 x 12 x 10 in. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer (Photo Credit: L.A. Louver).  

 

Apr 22
“What a Scientist Learned from Jazz about Innovation”4:00 p.m.

https://uoregon.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2tczfQozQESbrD-M8LX9HQ Stephon Alexander, professor of physics at Brown University and the president of the National Society of...
April 22 4:00 p.m.

https://uoregon.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2tczfQozQESbrD-M8LX9HQ

Stephon Alexander, professor of physics at Brown University and the president of the National Society of Black Physicists will give a talk “What a Scientist Learned from Jazz about Innovation” via Zoom as a guest of the UO Physics Department. The event will be hosted by the OHC and sponsored by the OHC’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities.

Alexander, who was born in Trinidad and moved the U.S. at eight, is a theoretical physicist specializing in cosmology, particle physics, and quantum gravity (String Theory and Loop Quantum Gravity). He has held previous appointments at Stanford University, Imperial College, Penn State, Dartmouth, and Haverford College. He is Executive Director of the Harlem Gallery of Science and an Affiliate Professor in Africana Studies at Brown.

Alexander, a jazz saxophonist, also explores interconnections between music, physics, mathematics, and technology though recordings, performance, teaching, and public lectures. He has performed and collaborated with Will Calhoun, Brian Eno, Marc Cary, Vernon Reid, Ronnie Burrage, and Jaron Lanier. He authored the book The Jazz of Physics: The Secret Link Between Music and the Structure of the Universe published in 2017, which uses jazz to answer physics’ most vexing questions about the past and future of the universe. Following the great minds that first drew the links between music and physics—a list including Pythagoras, Kepler, Newton, Einstein, and Rakim—The Jazz of Physics reveals that the ancient poetic idea of the “Music of the Spheres,” clarifies confounding issues in physics.

 

Apr 26
Spring Bounty: Meals To-Go1:00 p.m.

For our BIPOC and LGBTQ+ students Join us for a meal brought to your home! The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success, and the LGBT+ Education and Support...
April 26 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Black Cultural Center Patio

For our BIPOC and LGBTQ+ students

Join us for a meal brought to your home! The Multicultural Education, Engagement, and Student Success, and the LGBT+ Education and Support Services are providing our LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC students a pre-made meal.

Meals are portioned per-person and include vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free options. You must RSVP to claim - supplies are limited!

Pick up:
Black Cultural Center Patio
Monday April 26, 2021
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Menu:
Mojo chicken, yellow rice, chili lime grilled asparagus, side salad with balsamic dressing, and a fudge brownie
or
Vegan/made-without-gluten Mojo jackfruit, yellow rice, chili lime grilled asparagus, side salad with balsamic dressing, and a vegan/made-without-gluten cookie.

Register here: tinyURL.com/SpringBounty

Apr 27
Anthony McGill: Navigating Race in Classical Musicnoon

Trailblazing clarinetist Anthony McGill, who was the first African American to be appointed as a principal player with the renowned New York Philharmonic Orchestra, reflects...
April 27 noon–1:00 p.m.

Trailblazing clarinetist Anthony McGill, who was the first African American to be appointed as a principal player with the renowned New York Philharmonic Orchestra, reflects on the legacy and future of race in classical music. 

This virtual session is available only to current University of Oregon students, faculty and staff. Register to attend with a valid UO email address at https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4TNATZ0LF3mQkU6

Apr 29
Anthony McGill: Take Two Knees – Music, Gesture and Activismnoon

Internationally acclaimed clarinetist Anthony McGill urges musicians to shine a light on racism and “#TakeTwoKnees in the struggle for justice and...
April 29 noon–1:15 p.m.

Internationally acclaimed clarinetist Anthony McGill urges musicians to shine a light on racism and “#TakeTwoKnees in the struggle for justice and decency.” 

This virtual session is available only to current University of Oregon students, faculty and staff. Register to attend with a valid UO email address at https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4TNATZ0LF3mQkU6

Apr 30
Concert with KayelaJ Livestream7:00 p.m.

Kayela J will be performing for our second virtual show of spring term! The event will start Friday, 4/30 at 7:00pm PST! The livestream can be found through our linktree prior to...
April 30 7:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Kayela J will be performing for our second virtual show of spring term! The event will start Friday, 4/30 at 7:00pm PST! The livestream can be found through our linktree prior to the premiere date. Hope to see you all online then!

EMU YouTube page https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMmeqfNE4DiS6MACiSXCFUA Checkout past concerts there too.

May 6
Ducks After Dark Presents: Zoom Interview with Tyrone L. Robinson7:30 p.m.

Join us in an interview with renowned Broadway performer, TV actor, writer, and director Tyrone L. Robinson, known for his work in a variety of pieces including writing,...
May 6 7:30 p.m.

Join us in an interview with renowned Broadway performer, TV actor, writer, and director Tyrone L. Robinson, known for his work in a variety of pieces including writing, producing, and directing the short, "Un(H)armed!"

We will be hosting this interview through Zoom and will email the link to those who have sent in their RSVP on Thursday, May 6, at 6:30 PM. The interview will go from 7:30-9 PM. Must be a student or staff member to attend. RSVP is required.

May 27
Conversations About Our World Talk Series: Bioethics in the time of Black Lives Matter: A Black Feminist Perspective4:30 p.m.

Last summer saw the convergence of two major threats to public health: the COVID-19 pandemic and the enduring value gap between white and Black lives (referenced in the name of...
May 27 4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m.

Last summer saw the convergence of two major threats to public health: the COVID-19 pandemic and the enduring value gap between white and Black lives (referenced in the name of the protest movement Black Lives Matter). On April 8th of this year, the CDC released a statement naming racism as "a serious public health threat." By contrast, six weeks earlier, the Journal of the American Medical Association released a podcast (now withdrawn) in which the very existence of structural racism in medicine (by now a well proven fact) was called into question. In this conversation, within this larger social and political context, we will discuss how the CDC declaration might be translated into action and what Black feminist bioethicists can contribute to the ongoing conversation. 

Speakers:


Camisha Russell, Assistant (about to be Associate as of May 1) Professor, UO Department of Philosophy, University of Oregon
Yolonda Wilson, Associate Professor, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, Saint Louis University 


Join University of Oregon faculty, Dr. Arafaat A. Valiani (Associate Professor, History | Sociology | Global Health), Dr. Sangita Gopal (Associate Professor, Cinema Studies), and Dr. Bish Sen (Associate Professor, School of Journalism and Communication) for a speakers series during spring term 2021. All events will be held virtually and feature conversations between faculty and speakers from the University of Oregon community and beyond. Topics include Indigenous arts, global communications after Covid, and identity in Asian and Asian Studies, and more.

Sponsors

Asian Studies Program
Center for Asian and Pacific Studies
Center for the Study of Women in Society
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Anthropology
Department of History
Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies
Department of Sociology
Global Health Program
Global Studies Institute, Division of Global Engagement
Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities