Donate: Advancing the Mission of the Black Cultural Center

2021 Black Grad Ceremony

Congratulations to the Class of 2021 Black Grads!

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, the Black Student Union, and the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence celebrate and recognize our Black graduates in a virtual ceremony.

Announcing the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center Scholarships

Individual awards will range between $750–$5,000. Apply now through May 14, 2021.

Virtual Engagement

We are committed to maintaining high levels of support and resources for our students. During this time, the BCC and Dean of Students staff will continue to check and respond to voicemails and emails. In addition, the BCC will continue to offer resource navigation and support remotely, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. To reach the coordinator of the BCC, call 541-346-6321 or email arish@uoregon.edu if you need assistance. To reach the Dean of Students crisis team, call 541-346-3216.

Refer to the site below for official updates regarding the University of Oregon’s response to COVID-19, including frequently asked questions.

During the 2020–21 academic year, the university will be offering learning primarily online and remotely. While we may not be able to engage with one another within the BCC, we do welcome students to connect with the Black Cultural Center staff virtually. Please join us on social media and Zoom for events such as Virtual Super Soul Tuesdays and other virtual interactions and programming.

Umoja Black Scholars Academic Residential Community

Umoja Black Scholars image

The Umoja Black Scholars ARC is a space in the residence halls where Black students can come together, grow in their own identities, engage with peer mentors, and connect with academic advising and resources.

Applications for the 2021–22 Umoja Black Scholars cohort are open now through May 31, 2021.

Learn About Umoja Black Scholars

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker
Black Cultural Center

While the LRP Black Cultural Center is currently closed due to state and university guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still supporting students in person and remotely.

The outside porch of the BCC will be available to a limited number of students during Dr. Aris Hall's office hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1:00–4:00 p.m.; and Thursdays, 9:00 a.m.–noon.

1870 East 15th Avenue
Monday–Friday: 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. (offering services remotely)

BCC entry

Get Connected

If you are interested in staying up to date about what’s going on with the BCC, please provide your name and email using our online form to be added to our mailing list.


Our Mission

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is the engine for Black students’ academic success at the University of Oregon. The BCC is a welcoming and supportive space that helps Black students harness the resources necessary to navigate their social, cultural, and academic experience. By investing in the success of Black students, the BCC enhances the cultural and social development of the entire University of Oregon community.


Black Cultural Center Opening from University of Oregon on Vimeo.

UO Black Lives Matter


About Lyllye Reynolds-Parker

Lyllye Reynolds-ParkerLyllye Reynolds-Parker was born in Eugene in 1946 and was a member of the first graduating class of Henry D. Sheldon High School. Ms. Parker started her social justice work while in high school, being actively involved with the civil rights movement here. She was vice president of the local Student Non-violence Committee, an organization founded by Stokely Carmichael, an internationally known civil rights advocate.

Ms. Parker earned her BA in sociology from the UO in 1991. She worked at the UO as an academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Academic Success for 17 years, until she retired.

Ms. Parker has served on multiple advisory committees. She also serves on the board of a local nonprofit, the League of United Latin American Citizens, where she is the honorary chair of their Anti-Racial Profiling Committee.

The UO’s Women’s Center hosts an annual Lyllye B. Parker Womxn of Color Speaker Series to bring female speakers of color to campus.

Contact Us

 
Aris Hall, PhD
Coordinator, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center


Events

Sep 23
Welcome Party & Prize Raffle: Office of the Dean of Students11:00 a.m.

Play games, win prizes, and learn about some of the amazing resources available to all UO students through the Office of the Dean of Students (DOS). Featured groups include the...
September 23 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), EMU Amphitheater

Play games, win prizes, and learn about some of the amazing resources available to all UO students through the Office of the Dean of Students (DOS).

Featured groups include the Women's Center, IMPACT, Nontraditional Student Union, Holden Center, LGBT+ Education & Support Services (LGBTESS), Sexual Violence Prevention & Education (SVPE), Substance Abuse Prevention & Education (SAPE), Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center (BCC), and the Men's Resource Center (MRC).

Oct 1
A Family Affair: BCC Welcome4:30 p.m.

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center welcomes new and returning students back to campus with a family cookout. We will have tables for Black Student Organizations as...
October 1 4:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center welcomes new and returning students back to campus with a family cookout. We will have tables for Black Student Organizations as well as representatives from National Pan-Hellenic Fraternities and Sororities, often referred to as the "Divine 9". We welcome UO Black students, faculty, and staff to join us for the first of many events held at the LRP Black Cultural Center. More information to come on how to RSVP for the event.

Oct 5
Auditions! Personal History!6:30 p.m.

University Theatre Auditions: Personal History by Dominic Taylor                  Audition Sign Up Link:  ...
October 5–6
Miller Theatre Complex, Hope Theatre

University Theatre Auditions:

Personal History by Dominic Taylor                 

Audition Sign Up Link:   https://docs.google.com/document/d/11EyDvmP-XLfGrtbFkIA4txtGoy1pOWzuFFq6lCUEi1I/edit?usp=sharing

Tuesday or Wednesday, October 5/6, 6:30-8:30 pm

Hope Theatre, University of Oregon

AUDITIONS OPEN TO ALL UO STUDENTS!

 

Casting 6 actors:

Personal History has a cast of 2 African-American males, 1 African-American female, 2 Caucasian males, and 1 Caucasian female. Actors will be eligible to apply for a College of Arts and Sciences Diversity Scholarship and will work under the direction of noted African American director, Stanley Coleman. University Theatre encourages a diverse pool of students to audition for roles.

 

Audition Guidelines:

Students auditioning should prepare a 1-minute reading or memorized presentation from a poem, monologue, or song lyric.

 

Callbacks:

Thursday, 9/7/21, in the evening. Callbacks will involve readings from the script.

 

Synopsis of the Play: 

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated pharmacist Eugene enters the world of the play in 1903, outraged that he is overqualified and underemployed. At an elegant parlor party hosted by his white business associate, Eugene scandalizes the other guests by challenging their comfortable liberalism. He also meets his future bride, Bethany, herself an accomplished business owner. Toying with time, the play has the couple moving into this same home in an exclusive all-white neighborhood in the early 1950s. Race and class are further jumbled as the action shifts to the 1990s -- the house is now a chic restaurant where Eugene and Bethany, divorced years earlier, have their final transformative encounter.

 

Rehearsal and Performance Information:

Rehearsals will be held Sundays through Thursdays, beginning sometime mid-October, breaking for the holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year) and continuing when school resumes in January. Most rehearsals will begin at 6:30 pm until 9:00 pm. Performance dates are January 21, 22, January 28, 29, 30 (Matinee), February 4 and 5.

 

Special note to all auditioning:

University Theatre is producing a play, Personal History, by African American playwright Dominic Taylor.  The play has a cast of 2 African-American males, 1 African-American female, 2 Caucasian males, and 1 Caucasian female. Actors will be eligible to apply for a College of Arts and Sciences Diversity Scholarship and will work under the direction of noted African American director Stanley Coleman. University Theatre encourages a diverse pool of students to audition for roles.

 

Link to the Script:

You can read the entire script for free by following this link: https://www.playscripts.com/find-a-play?keyword=personal+history

                       

For further questions, please contact the director, Dr. Stanley Coleman, at scolem4@gmail.com.

 

 

Audition Sign Up: Sign Up Here
Audition Flyer
Audition Poster

Oct 26
Emerson Sykes | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 20225:30 p.m.

"The Case for Free Speech and Racial Justice Supporting Black Activism on Campus" Recently, young, Black activists have played a central role in America’s...
October 26 5:30 p.m.

"The Case for Free Speech and Racial Justice Supporting Black Activism on Campus"

Recently, young, Black activists have played a central role in America’s ongoing reckoning with white supremacy and anti-Blackness through protest, advocacy, and creative expression. But this is nothing new. Student activists have long wielded the power to shape the cultural narratives and society around them. Reflecting on his experiences working with campus activists from across the US and throughout Africa, a First Amendment attorney at the ACLU makes the case for reclaiming free speech as a progressive value and tool for social change.

About the speaker:

Emerson Sykes is a senior staff attorney at American Civil Liberties Union with the ACLU Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project. He focuses on First Amendment free speech protections and works on civil liberties and human rights at the local, national, and international levels. Formally, Sykes was a legal advisor for Africa at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL). He holds a J.D. from the New York University School of Law, and a Master of Public Affairs degree from Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. 

Nov 9
Julieanna Richardson | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 20225:30 p.m.

“The HistoryMakers: Preserving 20th Century African American Collections with 21st Century Solutions” For African Americans, the 20th century, in many ways,...
November 9 5:30 p.m.

“The HistoryMakers: Preserving 20th Century African American Collections with 21st Century Solutions”

For African Americans, the 20th century, in many ways, represented a century of growth and expansion even under difficult circumstances. To the dismay of many, the 21st century has seen a retrenchment in this growth as evidenced by continued social unrest, the siege on our nation’s capital, COVID 19 and the digital divide and educational disparities. Mainstream America’s knowledge of African Americans is still very limited and rooted in stereotypes. Many of the nation’s libraries, museums and archives contain racially biased or insensitive material and a lack of African American collections. The need to change is urgent, since society still preferences those who have documentary evidence of their value. Lonnie Bunch, the 14th Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, underscored this point in a 2016 interview when he warned that the 20th century African American historical record would be obliterated if corrective action was not taken within the next decade. Over the past twenty-one years, 821 HistoryMakers (approximately 25% of The HistoryMakers’ existing collection) have passed away. 2020 and 2021 have seen the deaths of HistoryMakers and civil rights leaders Reverend Joseph Lowery, Reverend CT Vivian and Charles Evers, baseball icon Hank Aaron, Mary Wilson of The Supremes, jazz legend Ellis Marsalis, Jr., country music legend Charley Pride, and art curator/historian David Driskell, among others. These deaths represent significant burnings of “libraries” of information. Yet, while building its own collection, The HistoryMakers has attempted to promote the preservation, growth and awareness of African American collections. While its efforts have resulted in permanent repositories for activist Angela Davis (Schlesinger Library), opera legend Jessye Norman (Library of Congress), actress Daphne Maxwell Reid (Northwestern University), and others, they are insufficient to stem prevention of the current wholesale loss of the 20th century African American historical record. The HistoryMakers seeks now to begin filling that void.

About the speaker:

Julieanna Richardson is the founder of The HistoryMakers, the largest national collection effort of African American video oral histories on record since the WPA Slave Narratives. She holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School. She founded her own production company, SCTN Teleproductions. Richardson was awarded the 2014 Legacy Award from Black Enterprise Magazine and was profiled in 2014’s American Masters: The Boomer List. 

Jan 21
Personal History by Dominic Taylor7:30 p.m.

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated...
January 21–February 5
Miller Theatre Complex, Hope Theatre

Personal History follows an African-American couple as they navigate three moments in American life, stretched out over a century in the city of Chicago. The highly educated pharmacist Eugene enters the world of the play in 1903, outraged that he is overqualified and underemployed. At an elegant parlor party hosted by his white business associate, Eugene scandalizes the other guests by challenging their comfortable liberalism. He also meets his future bride, Bethany, herself an accomplished business owner. As the action shifts from 1903 to the 1950s and eventually, to the 1990s, their relationship changes. The play is a snapshot of the history of African Americans and their struggles in this country.

Directed by Stanley Coleman

Dates: Jan. 21, 22, 28, 29, 30 (matinee), Feb. 4, 5

Produced by special arrangement with Playscripts, Inc. (www.playscripts.com)

 

$10 GA | $8 non-UO student/ UO faculty & staff/ senior | FREE for UO students with ID

https://tickets.uoregon.edu/personal-history

 

 

Feb 9
A’Lelia Bundles, UO Law School Derrick Bell Lecture | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 20225:30 p.m.

About the speaker: A’Lelia Bundles is an author and journalist. She is the author of On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker –...
February 9 5:30 p.m.

About the speaker:

A’Lelia Bundles is an author and journalist. She is the author of On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker – a New York Times Notable Book about her great-great-grandmother. Her book is the inspiration for Self Made, the fictional four-part Netflix series. Bundled is a vice-chair of Columbia University’s Board of Trustees and chair emerita of the board of the National Archives Foundation. She also is a member of the advisory boards of the March on Washington Film Festival and founded the Madam Walker Family Archives. She is currently working on a biography about her great-grandmother A’Lelia Walker. 

Mar 8
William Darity & Kirsten Mullen | African American Workshop and Lecture Series 2021 - 20225:30 p.m.

“Reconstruction, Redress and Redistributive Justice” William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen will build a case for reparations that includes, but goes beyond,...
March 8 5:30 p.m.

“Reconstruction, Redress and Redistributive Justice”

William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen will build a case for reparations that includes, but goes beyond, ‘slavery reparations.’ They will provide a strategy for a reparations plan. They also will talk about their award-winning publication, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century (UNC Press, 2020).

About the speakers:

Dr. William Darity Jr. and Ms. A. Kristen Mullen co-authored From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century. Their book confronts injustices head-on and makes the most comprehensive case to date for economic reparations for U.S. descendants of slavery. William Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics and the founding director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. A. Kirsten Mullen is a writer, folklorist, and museum consultant. She is the founder of Artefactual, an arts-consulting practice, and Carolina Circuit Writers, a literary consortium that brings expressive writers of color to the Carolinas.