The month of April is nationally recognized as Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). The Sexual Violence Prevention and Education team collaborates with campus and community partners to create a month full of educational and interactive ways to address sexual violence. The last week of the month, Sexual Violence Prevention Week, focuses on prevention programming and features Take Back the Night. Check out ways to get involved below!

We know that talking about sexual assault can cause heightened emotions; if you need a quiet place to decompress and recenter, the Duck Nest is available to students during its regular office hours. If you need support, please contact the University Counseling Center or visit safe.uoregon.edu.

Apr 6
One Love Lacrosse Game4:00 p.m.

Student-athletes at the lacrosse game on April 6th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents...
April 6 4:00 p.m.
Pape Field

Student-athletes at the lacrosse game on April 6th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents sexual assault awareness, and student-athletes want to use their platform to educate, raise awareness, and honor all who have been harmed.

Apr 7
Becoming Aware: Male Sexual Assault Survivors10:00 a.m.

Join Pacific University and Sexual Assault Support Services for a panel discussion on the important topic of adult male sexual assault survivors. This conference will address...
April 7 10:00 a.m.–noon
Pacific University Eugene, Classroom C

Join Pacific University and Sexual Assault Support Services for a panel discussion on the important topic of adult male sexual assault survivors. This conference will address various issues related to sexual assault against males. To RSVP, please email Carolyn Picetti, MSW Candidate, at pice1331@pacificu.edu

Apr 8
Men's Tennis vs. Arizona/Sexual Assault Awareness Month11:00 a.m.

Student-athletes at the Men's Tennis match on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color...
April 8 11:00 a.m.
Student Tennis Center

Student-athletes at the Men's Tennis match on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents sexual assault awareness and student-athletes want to use their platform to educate, raise awareness, and honor all who have been harmed.

Apr 8
Softball vs. Arizona State/Sexual Assault Awareness Month3:00 p.m.

Student-athletes at the Softball game on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents...
April 8 3:00 p.m.
Jane Sanders Stadium

Student-athletes at the Softball game on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents sexual assault awareness and student-athletes want to use their platform to educate, raise awareness, and honor all who have been harmed.

Apr 8
Acrobatics and Tumbling vs. Baylor/Sexual Assault Awareness Month5:00 p.m.

Student-athletes at the Acrobatics and Tumbling meet on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color...
April 8 5:00 p.m.
Matthew Knight Arena

Student-athletes at the Acrobatics and Tumbling meet on April 8th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents sexual assault awareness and student-athletes want to use their platform to educate, raise awareness, and honor all who have been harmed.

Apr 10
3250 Display10:00 a.m.

One in five women and one in sixteen men experience sexual violence by the time they leave college. If we apply these ratios to the...
April 10–12
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Fishbowl Terrace

One in five women and one in sixteen men experience sexual violence by the time they leave college. If we apply these ratios to the University of Oregon, that means that, statistically, 3250 people will be sexually assaulted during their time at UO. From April 10 to April 12, Fraternity and Sorority Life invites all UO community members to come reflect on this statistic and share commitments to reducing the number of people impacted by sexual violence. 

Apr 15
Women's Tennis vs. Utah/Sexual Assault Awareness Month11:00 a.m.

Student-athletes at the women's tennis match on April 15th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal...
April 15 11:00 a.m.
Student Tennis Center

Student-athletes at the women's tennis match on April 15th will be wearing teal shoelaces to show their support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence. The color teal represents sexual assault awareness and student-athletes want to use their platform to educate, raise awareness, and honor all who have been harmed.

Apr 16
Understanding Trauma and Coping with PTSD2:00 p.m.

If you’ve experienced trauma or know someone who has, you are not alone. While trauma can have profound impacts, it does not have to define who we become. This workshop will...
April 16 2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Duck Nest (041)

If you’ve experienced trauma or know someone who has, you are not alone. While trauma can have profound impacts, it does not have to define who we become. This workshop will increase your understanding of what constitutes trauma and increase your awareness of trauma prevalence, signs and symptoms, and campus resources that can help. This workshop will also equip you with coping strategies for managing symptoms related to trauma exposure and PTSD. This workshop is free and open to UO students, faculty, and staff.

Apr 16
Sexual Assault Awareness Month Open SWAT Workshop Hosted by CMAE6:00 p.m.

CMAE and the Sexual Wellness Advocacy Team (SWAT) will be hosting an open workshop on April 16th from 6 pm to 8 pm in HEDCO 146 for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. SWAT is a...
April 16 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
HEDCO Education Building, Room 146

CMAE and the Sexual Wellness Advocacy Team (SWAT) will be hosting an open workshop on April 16th from 6 pm to 8 pm in HEDCO 146 for Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

SWAT is a group of UO student peer educators committed to ending sexual assault and relationship violence at the University of Oregon. SWAT uses interactive, theater-based workshops to talk about healthy relationships and use a variety of facilitation styles to spur change at the UO and beyond. Their team is made up of students from across campus and from many different backgrounds and they are currently looking for students to join their team for the upcoming academic year.

Please share this information with your peers and student members.

 

If interested in attending the workshop on April 16th, please feel free to contact Jeffery Hall directly at jefferyh@uoregon.edu.

Apr 16
Hunting Ground Screening7:00 p.m.

The Hunting Ground is a documentary that exposes rape crimes on U.S college campuses, their institutional cover-ups, and the devastating toll they take on students and their...
April 16 7:00 p.m.
John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes, Jaqua 101

The Hunting Ground is a documentary that exposes rape crimes on U.S college campuses, their institutional cover-ups, and the devastating toll they take on students and their families. By showing this movie, we want the community here at the University of Oregon to become educated and aware of these issues on our campus. We want to show support in solidarity with survivors of sexual violence.

Apr 17
UPDATE: BE Activist with Charon Asetoyer - VIA SKYPE5:30 p.m.

Due to a snow storm preventing air travel from the north east/upper mid west, Charon Asetoyer will not be able to be here in Eugene as planned. She has agreed to Skype with us...
April 17 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium Room 214

Due to a snow storm preventing air travel from the north east/upper mid west, Charon Asetoyer will not be able to be here in Eugene as planned. She has agreed to Skype with us tonight at the original time.

The BEseries and the Native American Student Union (NASU) are honored to welcome Ms. Charon Asetoyer to the UO for a free presentation with dinner; please join us!

Charon Asetoyer (Comanche), is a Native American women's health advocate and community activist, and the Executive Director and Founder of the Native American Community Board (since its founding in 1985) and the Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center (since its creation in 1998) on the Yankton Sioux Reservation in Eastern South Dakota. She has been the leading pathfinder for the Native American community's improved health and well-being, providing health information, referral services and a resource center on education, women’s reproductive health, economic development, environment land and water rights protection.

Ms. Asetoyer believes in passing on traditional and holistic Native American/Indigenous healing methods through sharing ideas and education. She integrates these unique healing methods with community advocacy, grassroots organizing to implement improved environmental practices, challenging bio-medical paradigms, and modern approaches for the overall health and well-being of Indigenous people. These good medicines are passed down to the people, locally, regionally, and globally, without breaking the flow of Native American language, culture, and tradition.

NACB is the first organization of its kind located on a Native American reservation in the United States. The organization operates successfully, engineering and dispensing many programs with a well-guarded fiscal accountability. As a result, NACB has sustained a long and endearing history with many nationally-known, individual, family, and corporate foundations.

In April 2015, Ms. Asetoyer was named one of “The Top 10 Influential People in Indian Country” (http://indianz.com/News/2015/017298.asp). In March 2016, she was named by the Ms. Foundation for Women in partnership with NBCNEWS.com as one of 31 (for the 31 days in March, the Women’s History Month) women of color in the country who, through their actions and words, lead the way toward a more equal world.

Previously, she received “The Gloria Steinem Woman of Vision Award" from the Ms. Foundation for Women, and she received the United Nations Distinguished Services Award. In 2001, she received the “Jessie Bernard Wise Women Award” from the Center for Women Policy Studies. In 2002 she was one of the “Bread and Roses Award Winners,” an award honoring Women of Color in the Environmental Justice Movement held during The Second National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. Charon was one of twelve women honored with the "Bread and Roses" award for her leadership, impact in grassroots organizing, innovation in solving environmental justice problems, and commitment to the principles of environmental justice. In January 2005, she was selected to be one of the “21st Leaders for the 21st Century” by Women’s e-news. In 2017 Charon was the first American to receive Amnesty International’s Ginetta Sagan Award for Human Rights for her work with Indigenous women’s rights.

Ms. Asetoyer was nominated by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and thereby appointed and confirmed by the President of the United States (Clinton Administration) to serve on the National Advisory Council for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She is well-known as a public and private servant of Indigenous people on local and national levels.

Ms. Asetoyer has served on the Board of Directors of the Indigenous Women's Network, the board of directors for the Honor the Earth Campaign, and the Native American Community Board and was an appointee to the National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (NEJAC) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She has served on the National Minority AIDS Council in Washington, D.C. and as a National Advisory Committee Member for Action for Corporate Accountability based in New Haven, CT.

She served as an advisory committee member for the Center for Constitutional Rights, Women and People of Color (The AIDS Project, NY), and as an Advisory Committee Member for the Center for Women's Policy Studies (Women and AIDS) Project. She also served on The National Women's Health Network Board of Directors for eight years.  In 2001, she facilitated a working group on clean water at a convening of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on “The Current Status of Health of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.”

Charon was one of the original authors of points 1, 5,10,11,13 and 14 of the “Principles of Environmental Justice” which were adopted by Delegates to the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit in October 1991, in Washington DC. Since then, the Principles have served as a defining document for the growing grassroots movement for environmental justice.
She has written several articles on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and has written several articles on its impact on Indigenous populations. She has contributed articles on "Health and Reproductive Rights to the Indigenous Women" in Indigenous Women Address the World, a book derived from the U.N. Fourth World Conference On Women, Beijing, China, 1995.  Ms. Asetoyer's other publications include, "A Nation in Distress" Front Line Feminism, San Francisco, 1995, "First There Was Small Pox", Women, AIDS and Activism, Boston, MA, South End Press, 1990; pp. 91-94. Wicozanni Wowapi Good Health Newsletter, Fall 1995, Vol. I., "Native Americans: An Overview," HIV Prevention in Native American Communities. Oakland, CA: National Native American AIDS Prevention Center1992: pp.63-65., "Public Denial, Private Pain," Health Wire. January, 1994; pp. 1-3. "From the Ground Up," Race Class and Gender, Watsworth Publishing Company, London, 1998, pp. 529-534. “Article #132,” 250 Ways To Make America Better, George Magazine, Villard Publishing Company, New York, 1999, pp. 175-176. She edited and co-wrote NACB’s book (released November 2003), Indigenous Women’s Health, Within the Sacred Circle. She was a contributing editor for the graphic novel, What to Do When You're Raped, published by NAWHERC in 2016.

She has spoken at Dartmouth College, Harvard Law School, Hunter College, New York University, Oberlin College, University of Ohio, World Health Organization (WHO), numerous national conferences and rallies on reproductive health and rights of Indigenous women. Charon has also participated in many international forums concerning women’s issues, population and human rights issues. Prior to founding NACB, Charon developed a Native American Health Education Project for the American Friends (Quaker) Service Committee and worked to improve community health in San Francisco through the Urban Indian Health Clinic.

She holds a Masters of International Administration and Management (from the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont) with a Bachelors of Arts in Criminal Justice. 

Apr 18
LGBTQIA+ Survivor Support Group @ SASS6:00 p.m.

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) is now offering a support group for self-identified members of the LGBTQIA+ community ages 18 and over who have experienced any form of...
April 18–December 19
Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS)

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) is now offering a support group for self-identified members of the LGBTQIA+ community ages 18 and over who have experienced any form of sexual violence in the past or present.  The group is held every 3rd Wednesday of the month at our main office.  Drop-in basis, no registration required, all SASS services are free and confidential.

Apr 19
Get Explicit for Faculty/Staff3:00 p.m.

Sexual Violence Prevention and Education will be presenting Get Explicit, the workshop for new UO students, for interested faculty and staff. After the presentation, faculty and...
April 19–23
Ford Alumni Center, 403

Sexual Violence Prevention and Education will be presenting Get Explicit, the workshop for new UO students, for interested faculty and staff. After the presentation, faculty and staff will be invited to share thoughts about how to improve Get Explicit for future students.

Apr 20
Sexy Sundaes10:00 a.m.

Come learn about how giving and getting consent can be fun, enjoyable, and sexy for everyone involved. With ice cream. The event starts at 10:00 AM and ends when the ice...
April 20 10:00 a.m.
Living-Learning Center South, LLC Performance Hall

Come learn about how giving and getting consent can be fun, enjoyable, and sexy for everyone involved. With ice cream. The event starts at 10:00 AM and ends when the ice cream's gone; don't miss out!

Apr 23
Solidarity Wall10:00 a.m.

The Solidarity Wall is a project created by the ARISE program in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). The Solidarity Wall will stand in Memorial Quad for one week...
April 23–27
Memorial Quadrangle

The Solidarity Wall is a project created by the ARISE program in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). The Solidarity Wall will stand in Memorial Quad for one week as a blank canvas for students to share their words of encouragement for survivors of sexual assault. The purpose of The Solidarity Wall is to foster a community experience in awareness and restoration in regards to the issue of sexual assault

Apr 23
Title IX Office Drop-in Hours10:00 a.m.

UO students are invited to meet with Darci Heroy, Associate Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, to discuss issues, share concerns, and brainstorm solutions related to...
April 23 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Johnson Hall, 106

UO students are invited to meet with Darci Heroy, Associate Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, to discuss issues, share concerns, and brainstorm solutions related to gender-based discrimination, including sexual violence prevention and response.

Apr 23
How to be an Ally and Support Survivors of Sexual Violence6:30 p.m.

Sexual violence affects millions of people. Not all survivors of sexual violence choose to report their experience, and those that do often face challenging and sometimes hostile...
April 23 6:30 p.m.
Wesley Center

Sexual violence affects millions of people. Not all survivors of sexual violence choose to report their experience, and those that do often face challenging and sometimes hostile legal systems. Come learn how you can support survivors of sexual violence, and be an ally for all survivors. 

Presenters:
Kasia Mlynski, Staff Attorney – University of Oregon, Domestic Violence Clinic
Sara Ilanit, Legal Advocate – Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS)

FREE pizza will be served!

Apr 24
Let's Talk About It6:00 p.m.

...
April 24 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Crater Lake South room|145

INTER-SECTIONAL FEMINISM AND SEXUAL ASSAULT WITHIN MARGINALIZED COMMUNITIES

Food will be provided! So come and enjoy an engaging conversation! This event is hosted by Safe Ride and featuring awesome student organizations like BWA, MUJERS/MECHA, APASU!!!

Apr 26
Take Back the Night6:00 p.m.

Take Back the Night is a yearly international protest founded in 1976 which seeks to raise awareness about the realities of sexual violence on campus and in the community, both...
April 26 6:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Amphitheater

Take Back the Night is a yearly international protest founded in 1976 which seeks to raise awareness about the realities of sexual violence on campus and in the community, both for survivors of sexual violence and those who want to support and bear witness in solidarity.

Take Back the Night is a survivor-centered event that begins with a Rally in the EMU Amphitheater, continues as a March through the streets of Eugene to symbolize reclaiming people’s safety on public streets at night, and ends with a Speak-Out in the community during which survivors and their allies can share personal stories of how sexual violence has impacted their lives.

TBTN is organized by the UO Women’s Center in coalition with Sexual Assault Support Services of Lane County (SASS) and the University of Oregon Campus Community.

Apr 27
Wesley Center Open House10:00 a.m.

The day after Take Back the Night, the Wesley Center will be available for anyone who needs to process, either in quiet contemplation or in community with others. Refreshments...
April 27 10:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Wesley Community Center

The day after Take Back the Night, the Wesley Center will be available for anyone who needs to process, either in quiet contemplation or in community with others. Refreshments will also be available.

May 18
13 Reasons Why Screening and Debrief5:30 p.m.

The Suicide Prevention Team and the Student Suicide Prevention Team is partnering to host an opportunity to watch the first two episodes of season 2 of 13 Reasons Why. We will...
May 18 5:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Global Scholars Hall, 117

The Suicide Prevention Team and the Student Suicide Prevention Team is partnering to host an opportunity to watch the first two episodes of season 2 of 13 Reasons Why. We will also offer a chance to debrief each episode. Free food will be provided.

UO support staff (Dean of Students and University Counseling Center) will be available to talk with students in Global Scholars Hall 118 during this time.

There are various campus and community resources available to you and we encourage you to talk to someone.
 

UO Counseling Center: 541-346-3227
UO SAFE: 541-346-SAFE (7233)

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline…1-800-273-8255
Crisis Text Line…Text ‘HOME’ to 741-741